Unkppkpbetitelt

mattwaite:

I’ve been having somewhat of an existential crisis of late. I’ve been a speaker at multiple journalism conferences a year for more than a decade running now and I have started to wonder at the value of all that talking. Not that I feel all those sessions weren’t valuable — they were — but were…

sadish:

My wife’s iPhone started acting up. It kept going to the silent mode automatically, but it won’t do that when showing to the geniuses at the apple store. I had to take this video to prove to them and finally get her iPhone replaced.

newsme:

(This post is the sixth in News.me’s ongoing series, “Getting the News.” In our efforts to understand everything about social news, we’re reaching out to writers and thinkers we like to ask them how they get their daily news. Read the first post here. See all of the posts here.)

Talking About Making at the Met

ourrisd:

This Sunday Professor John Dunnigan MFA 80 ID will reflect on the history of American furniture design when he speaks at the Metropolitan Museum in New York. He’s one of the panelists in a Sunday at the Met series on the art of fine furniture-making, inspired by the Duncan Phyfe exhibition on view through early May.

Talking About Making at the Met

ourrisd:

This Sunday Professor John Dunnigan MFA 80 ID will reflect on the history of American furniture design when he speaks at the Metropolitan Museum in New York. He’s one of the panelists in a Sunday at the Met series on the art of fine furniture-making, inspired by the Duncan Phyfe exhibition on view through early May.

votizen:

Jason Goldman (@goldman), a co-founder of Obvious and a former VP Product at Twitter and PM at Blogger, wrote three great tweets today about why he is anti-SOPA, which emulate the philosophies behind Votizen—below we combine this tweets here in a quote:

I’m not a big believer in American…

Gardens

lareviewofbooks:


SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS on Trea Martyn’s Queen Elizabeth in the Garden,
Clyde Phillip Wachsberger’s Into the Garden with Charles,
and Christian McEwen’s World Enough & Time.


Trea Martyn
Queen Elizabeth in the Garden: A Story of Love, Rivalry, and Spectacular Gardens

Bluebridge, January 2012. 336 pp.

Imagine a time when, to win a woman’s love, the ardent suitor had to create a garden more beautiful, more sensual, more unusual than his competition. Seen through Trea Martyn’s fascinating lens, the fate of England in the 16th century rested on just such a competition, waged by Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester and William Cecil, Elizabeth’s Lord Treasurer. Cecil created his fabulous, strange gardens at his estate, Theobalds. Dudley spent the equivalent of millions of dollars on his gardens at Kenilworth Castle. Cecil was a constant, mild man; Dudley a bit of a hothead who longed to prove himself in battle. Endless songs and poems and puns about the competition were written for the Queen’s attention. Each spring, she would decamp from London with her court to visit friends and subjects — these trips were called the Queen’s progresses, and they very nearly bankrupted the hosts. The excess — the food, fireworks, fountains, plays, and myriad follies — were well documented, but Martyn brings these marvelous, strange parties and dinners to life. There is also a great deal of information here on the history of gardening (Italian gardens were all the rage during Elizabeth’s reign), the British infatuation with flowers, herbs, and plants from around the world, and the creation of herbal apothecaries (Elizabeth insisted on treating her ailments with herbal remedies). Great gardeners like Mountain Jennings, John Tradescant, Thomas Hill, John Gerard, and William Turner all make appearances in this capacious book. It is easier to root for Dudley, whose untimely death cut short his imaginative gardening — but Cecil was a worthy opponent, and Elizabeth played them both quite cruelly.

Read More

betashop:

We’re on a mission here at Fab to be the world’s most valuable design resource.

In June 2011 we opened our doors and took big strides towards achieving that goal. 7 months later 1.65 million people have now joined Fab. 350,000 new design enthusiasts have signed up in the last 30 days…

newshour:

Gabrielle Giffords received a standing ovation from those in attendance at SOTU. (if you missed it)

villagevoice:

“I’m not down in Florida playing golf. I’m still in the East Village. Things haven’t changed that much for me.” Philip Glass to Steven Thrasher in this week’s cover story about the world-renowned composer’s  life as a neighborhood staple.

villagevoice:

“I’m not down in Florida playing golf. I’m still in the East Village. Things haven’t changed that much for me.” Philip Glass to Steven Thrasher in this week’s cover story about the world-renowned composer’s  life as a neighborhood staple.